Apr 102013
 

Refrigerated Interior of an RLLX Cold Train

It’s not the biggest or busiest port in Washington state, but the Port of Quincy is leading the way in an advanced form of transportation known as a Cold Train.

The idea was pioneered by RRLX Cold Train, which partners with railroads and ports to ship goods that need to remain in cold storage while being transported. The Cold Train service began at the Port of Quincy in 2010 and was specifically designed as an intermodal model, meaning it can easily be trans-loaded from rail to truck to ship. The volume of goods being shipped has increased rapidly since the start of operations.

The Port of Quincy’s Cold Train service was even highlighted in a study conducted earlier this year by the Washington Apple Commission on the economic impact of the state’s apple industry. The refrigerated intermodal transport system plays an important role in shipping apples, among other cold-stored goods, across the country while maintaining freshness and quality. About 70 percent of the eastbound Cold Train cargo is fresh Washington apples, with the remainder being other fresh and processed Washington fruits and vegetables.

“We are very pleased that the Port of Quincy Intermodal Terminal has become an important shipping and distribution hub for Washington State apples and that the Cold Train is being recognized as an important freight mobility option to ship Washington State apples to the Midwest and East Coast,” said Curt Morris, Chair of the Port of Quincy.

Port of Quincy is located in Central Washington between Ellensburg, Wenatchee and Moses Lake. Its position on the Seattle-Chicago railway, readily available irrigation water and cheap electricity has made it an increasingly popular hub for Washington’s agricultural business. According to the Commission’s study, Washington’s apple industry is a major economic driver for the state. The apple industry boosted the Washington economy by an estimated $7.02 billion in direct, indirect and induced economic activity from 2010 to 2011.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.